Ten Meter Tower (2017)

 

‘Ten Meter Tower’ by Maximilien Van Aertryck and Axel Danielson appeared at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. It is part of a series produced by independent filmmakers who have received support from the non-profit Sundance Institute.

Our objective in making this film was something of a psychology experiment: We sought to capture people facing a difficult situation, to make a portrait of humans in doubt. We’ve all seen actors playing doubt in fiction films, but we have few true images of the feeling in documentaries. To make them, we decided to put people in a situation powerful enough not to need any classic narrative framework. A high dive seemed like the perfect scenario.

 

Through an online advertisement, we found 67 people who had never been on a 10-meter (about 33 feet) diving tower before, and had never jumped from that high. We paid each of them the equivalent of about $30 to participate — which meant climbing up to the diving board and walking to its edge. We were as interested in the people who decided to climb back down as the ones jumping.

 

We filmed it all with six cameras and several microphones. It was important for us not to conceal the fact that this was an arranged situation, and thus we chose to show the microphones within the frame. Ultimately, about 70 percent of those who climbed did jump. We noticed that the presence of the camera as well as the social pressure (from those awaiting their turn beside the pool) pushed some of the participants to jump, which made their behaviour even more interesting.

 

In our films, which we often call studies, we want to portray human behaviour, rather than tell our own stories about it. We hope the result is a series of meaningful references, in the form of moving images. “Ten Meter Tower” may take place in Sweden, but we think it elucidates something essentially human, that transcends culture and origins. Overcoming our most cautious impulses with bravery unites all humankind. It’s something that has shaped us through the ages.

http://www.maximilienvanaertryck.com/
http://www.plattformproduktion.se/

Johnny Bubble (2017)

 

“Johnny Bubble is a fictional creature who has lived a long and happy life with a beautiful family and strong ties to the community.”

animation by Alan Resnick
music by Andrew Bernstein

Sonic Outlaws (1995)

 

The motto of this fast-paced, often hilarious American documentary that examines the changing attitudes towards multi-media plagiarism is “Copyright Infringement Is Your Best Entertainment Value.” To make his point, filmmaker Craig Baldwin presents a collage of interviews, illegally “borrowed” samplings, and legal cases, providing examples of each that range from a record company’s lawsuit against an independent rock band’s satirical samplings to cellular phone scanners, to “billboard bandits.” Baldwin also points out historical examples of artist’s stealing ideas from each other.

Directed By: Craig Baldwin. Features interviews with: Negativland, John Oswald, Tape-beatles and more

Nmesh – Drug Full Of Remixes

 

Nmesh - Drug Full of Remixes front cover art

“Fans, peers, and proper legends have a go at one of the most deranged and colossal Nmesh tracks in recent history – no holds barred – results vary drastically – i can’t believe i still have say this, but 𝒫𝐿𝐸𝒜𝒮𝐸 𝐸𝒩𝒥𝒪𝒴 𝑅𝐸𝒮𝒫𝒪𝒩𝒮𝐼𝐵𝐿𝒴.” – NMESH

A lovely review of the cubus remix by listencorp:

“We end with Cubus. A grey fog falls over us as we lay bruised and beaten by all the tracks before. Flashes appear all around us, but the layer of echoed sound shrouds like fog and does not permit us to see the full form of anything. An austere take on Nmesh’s original, we find ourselves adrift. Not tripping out in any immediate or intense way, but awash with ethereal plumes of grey nothingness. Certain tones and sounds hang in the air in front of us. It becomes impossible to identify melody from percussion. The artist’s employed in this remix compilation have made it their duty to stretch the boundaries of the source material so far, that the final take on the track is unbelievably poignant and affecting. Much like Drohnwerks remix, its difficult to identify what was used from Mall Full of Drugs in this track. But the boundless chasm that is enshrined before us is the perfect closer to a perfect journey.”

Album available here – https://nmesh.bandcamp.com/album/drug-full-of-remixes

The Mirror and the Light by Middlemarch

 

The Mirror and the Light album cover

Finally something new from cubus ! The duo of Dimitris Avramidis and Ross Baker, better known as Middlemarch, join the Carpe Sonum roster after the quietly devastating Wolf Hall, issued on Time Released Sound in 2014. This disc of remixes retains the magisterial heft and splendor of that sterling debut, with all the album’s participants building on the duo’s template while adding numerous idiosyncratic touches of their own. The opening “Visitation”, strangely enough, doesn’t really prepare you for the detached, pixillated sparsescape of “The Dead Complain of their Burial” but its cinematic vocabulary is as revealing in its own atmospheric way as its predecessor. Across the record’s timespan, the collective of remixers that includes Mick Chillage, Maps and Diagrams, Darren McClure, Ambidextrous, Neotropic, Off Land, and others wrestle with the duo’s blossoming & Budd-ing tendencies, reflecting the subtly shifting piano motifs and flurrying electronic textures in their own inimitable fashion. Chillage especially shines, as his interpretation of “A Painter’s Eye” is a thing of regal beauty. Neotropic’s post-classical side is also especially notable, as her version of “Visitation” channels a strange, quasi-glitchy/ivory-tickled hybrid, maximizing a myriad of odd warbles and Derbyshire-esque touches to produce over six minutes of pure pleasure. So rarely do remix albums succeed on their own merits; here’s one where the sum easily transcends its component parts, setting a new gold standard by which successive others will no doubt be judged.

The remix album can be streamed and purchased here – https://middlemarch.bandcamp.com/

Graham Dunning and the Mechanical Techno Turntable (2015)

 

“Multiple layers of modified records rotate on the turntable. Some of the vinyl has been sliced and bent, while others have little nuts and bolts drilled in or are covered in stickers to blank out certain sections. A ring stand—normally used to clamp test tubes in laboratories—holds a few contact mics. The tonearm is precariously held in place, tethered by a string leash. With every revolution, analog synths and drum machines are triggered. A beat even gets tapped out on a cowbell, without any human touch. This is Mechanical Techno.” – Nara Shin

Full interview here – http://www.coolhunting.com/culture/interview-graham-dunning-mechanical-techno-turntable-machine